News and Notes 281 September 20

In observance of National Spinal Cord Injury (SCI) Awareness Month, NARIC's Director Marc Odum reflects on the future of SCI, and NARIC shares research and resources from the NIDILRR community and elsewhere in the Spotlight Blog; Research in Focus looks at the connection between depression and behavior problems after TBI; Transitions RTC publishes new factsheet, Saving Money for a Better Life While on SSI: What Can the ABLE Act Do for Me?; Boston-Harvard Burn Injury Model System Center and LIBRE Project share information on burn injury and recovery at Burn Survivors of New England (BSONE) Walk for Advocacy and Awareness; KTDRR hosts webcast, Can We Still Call It Evidence-Based Practice (EBP) if We Deviate from the Evidence?; Healthy Aging RRTC hosts webinar series, State of the Science: Advances at the Intersection of Aging and Long-Term Disability; Advanced Rehabilitation Research Training (ARRT) project at Virginia Commonwealth University has fellowship position openings for postdoctoral students of neurological conditions and disorders; National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine (NASEM) release The Promise of Assistive Technology: An Interactive Guide to Selected Products and Funding Sources.

Date sent: 
2017-09-20
NARIC news: 

September is National Spinal Cord Injury (SCI) Awareness Month and we're looking into the future of SCI. Advances in treatment and technology mean people with SCI are living and working longer than ever before. In the last 10 years we've seen innovations in mobility technology, like exoskeletons and stair-climbing wheelchairs; smarthome technology that can control lights, doors, and thermostats; even brain-computer interface technology, using signals from the brain to move robotic arms or type a message on a computer. In honor of SCI Awareness Month, NARIC's Director Mark Odum reflected on the future of SCI in our Spotlight Blog, and we shared research and resources from the NIDILRR community and elsewhere.

Research In Focus:
For People with Traumatic Brain Injury, Early Depression and Behavior Problems May Be Connected
This week's Research In Focus looks at the connection between depression and behavior problems after traumatic brain injury (TBI)

Resource Highlight: 

Saving Money for a Better Life While on SSI
The NIDILRR-funded Rehabilitation Research and Training Center on Learning and Working During the Transition to Adulthood (Transitions RTC) (90RT5031) has published a new factsheet, Saving Money for a Better Life While on SSI: What Can the ABLE Act Do for Me? (PDF). The four-page factsheet introduces the Achieving a Better Life Experience (ABLE) Act, which gives people with disabilities a way to save money for qualifying expenses such as a car, college or career training, healthcare, prevention and wellness, and other expenses without being taxed or impacting eligibility for benefit programs. Sections cover eligibility, how to open an account, and myths and common questions about ABLE Accounts. This project is also supported by the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA).

News items: 

Boston Harvard Burn Injury Model System Center and LIBRE Team Members Join BSONE Walk
Members of the NIDILRR-funded Boston-Harvard Burn Injury Model System Center (90DP0035) and the project on Measurement of Community Participation Using a Computer Adaptive Test in Persons with Burn Injuries (LIBRE Project) (90DP0055) shared information on burn injury and recovery as part of the Burn Survivors of New England (BSONE) Walk for Advocacy and Awareness on September 9th. The official t-shirt for the walk featured the hashtag #JustSmile, referring to a video developed by the LIBRE project and BSONE that demonstrates some of the difficulties encountered by burn survivors and a simple approach to creating a more positive and accepting environment.

Grantee event: 

Webcast: Can We Still Call It EBP if We Deviate from the Evidence?
The NIDILRR-funded Center on Knowledge Translation for Disability and Rehabilitation Research (KTDRR) (90DP0027) will host a webcast, Can We Still Call It Evidence-Based Practice (EBP) if We Deviate from the Evidence?, September 27th, 2-4pm ET. Marcel Dijkers, PhD, will lead a discussion on the limits of EBP, including whether an intervention can still be considered evidence-based if a clinician does not have the same patients, setting, or resources and is unable to implement it exactly as described. Registration is free and required.

State of the Science: Advances at the Intersection of Aging and Disability
The NIDILRR-funded Rehabilitation Research and Training Center on Promoting Healthy Aging for Individuals with Long-Term Physical Disabilities (Healthy Aging RRTC) (90RT5023) will host a webinar series, State of the Science: Advances at the Intersection of Aging and Long-Term Disability, on October 16th, 18th, and 20th, 12-2pm, ET, along with the National Council on Aging. The webinar series will highlight recent advances in research, support, and long-term services for people aging with disabilities. Registration for each session is free and required.

Participate: 

ARRT Postdoctoral Fellowship Opportunities Available
The NIDILRR-funded Advanced Rehabilitation Research Training (ARRT) project at Virginia Commonwealth University (90AR5025) has fellowship position openings for postdoctoral students studying a diversity of neurological conditions and disorders. The two-year fellowship program offers comprehensive training in areas relating to neurological disorders and rehabilitation, including mentorship with accomplished medical school faculty, involvement in ongoing clinical research, and development of scientific publications and grant applications. Program and application information are available from the project's website.

Elsewhere in the Community: 

National Academies Debut Interactive Guide to Assistive Technology
The National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine (NASEM) have released The Promise of Assistive Technology: An Interactive Guide to Selected Products and Funding Sources. The guide gives a broad overview of selected assistive products and available funding sources. Based on a report from NASEM, the interactive guide allows the user to compare the benefits, limitations, and physical requirements of products in four major categories: mobility devices, upper extremity prostheses, selected hearing technologies, and communication and speech technologies.