News and Notes 123 July 16

Assisting travelers with disabilities; video on balancing work and benefits after SCI; TU Collaborative guide helping researchers develop consent procedures for study participants with psychiatric disabilities; NIBIB Bionic Man interactive web tool teaching about cutting-edge research in biotechnology; results of the Wireless RERC Fifth Annual Getting Wireless student design challenge; principal investigator of Transitions RTC a panelist at webcast presentation during Georgetown University Training Institutes 2014 conference on improving children's mental health care; co-project director of Moss Traumatic Brain Injury Model System Center accepts Mitchell Rosenthal Award as lead author of paper using data from TBINDSC; KTDRR-hosted webinar is final installment of a series, Systematic Reviews: From Evidence to Recommendation.

Date sent: 
2014-07-16
NARIC news: 

Summer is about half over, and we're right in the middle of the summer travel season. Traveling at this time of year can be a challenge and travelers with disabilities may experience greater difficulty in getting to their destination. We suggest these items on assisting travelers with disabilities from the NIDRR community and other sources, all available through our document delivery service. Need local help? See these travel-related organizations from our Knowledgebase!

Resource Highlight: 

Balancing Work and Benefits After Spinal Cord Injury
The NIDRR-funded Northwest Regional Spinal Cord Injury System Center (NWRSCIS) (H133N110009) has posted a new SCI Forum Video: Balancing Work and Benefits After Spinal Cord Injury. A benefits counselor with Plan to Work of Washington State explains the different work incentives programs and other benefits available to individuals with disabilities so viewers can better understand the process of getting back to work while maintaining medical coverage and coming out financially ahead. Viewers are asked to complete a 2-minute survey after watching the video. A full archive of SCI Forum Videos is available.

Inclusion in Research - Documenting Capacity to Consent
The NIDRR-funded Rehabilitation Research and Training Center on Community Inclusion of Individuals with Psychiatric Disabilities (TU Collaborative) (H133B130014) has developed Inclusion in Research - Documenting Capacity to Consent (PDF). The two-page guide was created to help researchers develop consent procedures that ensure participants with psychiatric disabilities understand study procedures and demonstrate this population has the capacity to consent to research participation.

News items: 

Wireless RERC Announces Getting Wireless Challenge Results
The NIDRR-funded Rehabilitation Engineering Research Center for Wireless Technologies (Wireless RERC) (H133E110002) held its Fifth Annual Getting Wireless student design challenge. Student teams from Georgia Tech and Virginia Tech were assigned one of four customer personas, developed from the Wireless RERC's Survey of User Needs, each presenting a real-life scenario which might be addressed through wearable wireless technology: a mother of a child with autism, an individual with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), a senior with low vision and limited mobility, and an individual with a progressive hearing loss. The challenge resulted in 17 prototype designs, including smart watches, activity monitors, alert systems, and tools for social media sharing.

Transition in Focus at Georgetown University Training Institute
Maryann Davis, PhD, principal investigator of the NIDRR-funded Learning and Working During the Transition to Adulthood Rehabilitation Research and Training Center (Transitions RTC) (H133B090018), will be a panelist at a presentation, The REAL Real World: Helping Young People on Their Journey to Adulthood, part of the Georgetown University Training Institutes 2014 conference on Improving Children's Mental Health Care in an Era of Change, Challenge, and Innovation: The Role of the System of Care Approach. KSOC-TV will webcast the presentation LIVE TOMORROW, July 17th, 10:30-11:30am ET. The presentation will focus on emerging issues among young adults in transition, ages 18 to 25, including employment, housing, education, juvenile justice, and peer support.

John Whyte Receives Mitchell Rosenthal Award
John Whyte, MD, PhD, co-project director of the NIDRR-funded Moss Traumatic Brain Injury Model System Center (H133A120037), accepted the Mitchell Rosenthal Award as lead author of Functional outcomes in traumatic disorders of consciousness: 5-year outcomes from the National Institute on Disability and Rehabilitation Research Traumatic Brain Injury Model Systems (abstract) in the October 2013 issue of the Archives of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation. The award recognizes the best scientific paper using data from the NIDRR-funded Traumatic Brain Injury Model Systems National Data and Statistical Center (TBINDSC) (H133A110006).

Grantee event: 

Webinar: There is more to be done: Future possibilities… Will we ever get there? TODAY
The Community of Practice (CoP) on Evidence for Disability and Rehabilitation of the NIDRR-funded Center on Knowledge Translation for Disability and Rehabilitation Research (KTDRR) will host There is more to be done: Future possibilities… Will we ever get there?, the final installment of the webinar series, Systematic Reviews: From Evidence to Recommendation, TODAY, 3-4:30pm ET. Marcel Dijkers, PhD, will discuss future developments in qualifying evidence that might benefit disability/rehabilitation practice. Registration is free for this series.

Elsewhere in the Community: 

NIBIB Bionic Man
The National Institute of Biomedical Imaging and Bioengineering (NIBIB) at the National Institutes of Health recently launched the NIBIB Bionic Man, an interactive Web tool that teaches students and the public about cutting-edge research in biotechnology, inspiring the next generation of bioengineers. It features 14 technologies currently being developed by NIBIB-supported researchers, including a powered prosthetic leg that helps users achieve a more natural gait, a wireless brain-computer interface that lets people with paralyzed legs and arms control computer devices or robotic limbs using only their thoughts, and a micro-patch that delivers vaccines painlessly and doesn’t need refrigeration.