News and Notes 265 May 24

NARIC blog posts feature research and resources from the NIDILRR community and elsewhere to help readers with disabilities Age Out Loud in observance of Older Americans Month; Rehabilitation Research and Training Center on Community Living for People with Intellectual Disabilities (RTC/CL) releases report, based on its National Residential Information Systems Project (RISP), In-Home and Residential Long-Term Supports and Services for Persons with Intellectual or Developmental Disabilities; two team members from Spaulding Hospital-New England Regional Spinal Cord Injury Center (SNERSCIC) discuss My Care, My Call peer health coaching intervention for people with SCI on RehabCast podcast in the Archives of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation; Rory Cooper of University of Pittsburgh Model Cener on Spinal Cord Injury featured on cover of New Mobility; Center on Knowledge Translation for Disability and Rehabilitation Research (KTDRR) hosts webcast, Translating the Evidence on Individual Placement and Support (IPS) into Practice: Applications with Spinal Cord Injury (SCI); Southeastern Regional Spinal Cord Injury Model System Center (SERSCIMS) conducts survey of the qualities of spasticity after SCI; National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine publish report, The Promise of Assistive Technology (AT) to Enhance Activity and Work Participation, the result of a committee of experts that included NIDILRR grantees.

Date sent: 
2017-05-24
NARIC news: 

Continuing the May observances, it's Older Americans Month encouraging everyone to Age Out Loud! With innovations in treatment and technology, people with disabilities are living longer and the population of older Americans aging with disabilities is growing. These older Americans are experiencing the same age-related conditions as those without disabilities: arthritis, stroke and cardiac conditions, metabolic changes, cognitive changes, and vision and hearing loss. Factors such as resilience, community support, and access to wellness programs mean people with disabilities can Age Out Loud with the rest of the crowd! Check out our blog posts on staying fit, taking charge of your health, and aging well with a disability, featuring research and resources from the NIDILRR community and elsewhere available online and from the NARIC collection.

Resource Highlight: 

RISP Report: In-Home and Residential Long-Term Supports and Services for Persons with Intellectual or Developmental Disabilities
The NIDILRR-funded Rehabilitation Research and Training Center on Community Living for People with Intellectual Disabilities (RTC/CL) (90RT5019) has released a report, In-Home and Residential Long-Term Supports and Services for Persons with Intellectual or Developmental Disabilities: Status and Trends Through 2014 (PDF). The report, based on RTC/CL's National Residential Information Systems Project (RISP), presents national and state-level data on publicly-funded residential service setting types, setting sizes, funding authorities, and expenditures for persons with intellectual and developmental disabilities in the United States. In addition to the national report, data are available in brief state profiles that highlight specific findings. Infographics are contained in the executive summary of the report that present summary data from FY2014.

News items: 

My Care, My Call Highlighted in RehabCast
Bethlyn Houlihan and Sarah Everhart-Skeels, team members from the NIDILRR-funded Spaulding Hospital-New England Regional Spinal Cord Injury Center (SNERSCIC) (90SI5021), were interviewed on the most recent RehabCast podcast from the Archives of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation discussing My Care, My Call, a peer health coaching intervention designed to keep people living with SCI engaged in their own care. Ms. Houlihan and Ms. Everhart-Skeels discussed how the intervention was developed and tested, the role of peer counselors, and how the program supports people with chronic SCI to manage their health in the long term.

NIDILRR Investigator Featured on the Cover of New Mobility
Rory Cooper, PhD, co-director of the NIDILRR-funded University of Pittsburgh Model Center on Spinal Cord Injury (90SI5008), is featured in the cover article of the May issue of New Mobility magazine. The article discusses Dr. Cooper's long career in research and development, and the innovative technology he and his teams have developed including wheeled mobility, robotics, and other assistive technology.

Grantee event: 

Webcast: Translating the Evidence on IPS into Practice - Applications with SCI
The NIDILRR-funded Center on Knowledge Translation for Disability and Rehabilitation Research (KTDRR) (90DP0012) will host a webcast, Translating the Evidence on Individual Placement and Support (IPS) into Practice: Applications with Spinal Cord Injury (SCI), May 31st, 3-4pm ET. A panel of researchers and practitioners will review research on the use of IPS with individuals with SCI, evaluate the unique aspects of applying the IPS model in a SCI healthcare setting, and discuss guidelines for successful implementations of IPS in SCI settings. Registration is free and required.

Participate: 

Spasticity Survey
The NIDILRR-funded Southeastern Regional Spinal Cord Injury Model System Center (SERSCIMS) (90SI5016)  is conducting a survey of the qualities of spasticity after SCI. Participants will answer questions about their injury, qualities of their spasticity, and what makes the spasticity better or worse. The survey is open to individuals with SCI of all ages and levels of paralysis. The information will be used to set research priorities in the design of new studies of the treatment of spasticity.

Elsewhere in the Community: 

The Promise of AT to Enhance Activity and Work Participation
The National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine have published a report, The Promise of Assistive Technology (AT) to Enhance Activity and Work Participation, the result of a committee of experts which included members of the NIDILRR grantee community. The committee analyzed the use of assistive products and technologies in four categories: wheeled and seated mobility devices, upper-extremity prostheses, hearing devices, and communication and speech technologies. The report describes the range of these technologies and how they support and enable people with disabilities to enter or return to the workforce.