News and Notes 263 May 10

NARIC offers information from the NIDILRR community and other sources in observance of Mental Health Awareness Month; Research in Focus discusses challenges adults with intellectual and developmental disabilities may face in staying physically active; TU Collaborative publishes Promoting Supportive Academic Environments for Faculty with Mental Illnesses; principal investigator of Spaulding-Harvard Traumatic Brain Injury Model Center receives 2017 Robert L. Moody Prize for Distinguished Initiatives in Brain Injury Research and Rehabilitation; ThinkCollege, NIDILRR-funded 2008-2012, highlighted in The Atlantic magazine's May article The path to higher education with an intellectual disability; RRTC on Advancing Employment for Individuals with Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities hosts webinar, Ideal Versus Real: How Data Can Drive Employment Service Practices, part of the 44 Webinar series; Great Lakes ADA Regional Center hosts webinar, Free Web Evaluation Tools: What They Can (and Can't) Do; US Equal Employment Opportunity Commission (EEOC) offers Q&A factsheet, Depression, PTSD, and Other Mental Health Conditions in the Workplace: Your Legal Rights.

Date sent: 
2017-05-10
NARIC news: 

May observances continue with Mental Health Awareness Month! Researchers at the National Institutes of Health met this week to discuss Grand Challenges in Global Mental Health. Among the 40 grand challenges are improving access to evidence-based interventions, involving people with mental health conditions in policy and practice development, developing culturally informed methods to foster inclusion, and integrating mental health into health care. The work of the NIDILRR community touches on these and many other issues in the list of Grand Challenges (such as the Resource Highlight below). Explore NIDILRR-funded projects currently working in the areas of mental health and psychiatric disabilities in the NIDILRR Program Database and browse through resources on depression, aging and mental health, early screening and intervention, and more from the NIDILRR community and other sources available from the NARIC collection.

Research In Focus:
Adults with Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities May Face Challenges to Staying Physically Active
This week's Research In Focus finds that staying physically active can be more challenging for some people with intellectual and developmental disabilities.

Resource Highlight: 

Promoting Supportive Academic Environments for Faculty with Mental Illnesses
The NIDILRR-funded Rehabilitation Research and Training Center on Community Living and Participation of Individuals with Psychiatric Disabilities (TU Collaborative) (90RT5021) has published Promoting Supportive Academic Environments for Faculty with Mental Illnesses. This resource guide provides a review of current research into the experiences of academic faculty with mental illnesses and a set of recommendations for academic administrators and colleagues to promote a more welcoming work environment in higher education.

News items: 

NIDILRR Researcher Receives Moody Prize
Joseph Giacino, PhD, principal investigator of the NIDILRR-funded Spaulding-Harvard Traumatic Brain Injury Model System Center (90DP0039), received the 2017 Robert L. Moody Prize for Distinguished Initiatives in Brain Injury Research and Rehabilitation. The award honors and recognizes an individual or a team who have made significant contributions in applied brain injury research and rehabilitation. The Moody Prize is presented by the University of Texas Medical Branch (UTMB) School of Health Professions and The Transitional Learning Center of Galveston.

ThinkCollege Highlighted in The Atlantic
Research from the NIDILRR-funded Center on Postsecondary Education for Students with Intellectual Disabilities (ThinkCollege, 2008-2012) (H133A080042)  was highlighted in The path to higher education with an intellectual disability in the May issue of The Atlantic magazine. Principal Investigator Meg Grigal, PhD, discussed the growing number of college programs for students with intellectual disabilities and how these programs can lead to better employment options when students head into the workforce.

Grantee event: 

Webinar: Ideal Versus Real - How Data Can Drive Employment Service Practices
The NIDILRR-funded Rehabilitation Research and Training Center on Advancing Employment for Individuals with Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities (90RT5028) will host a webinar, Ideal Versus Real: How Data Can Drive Employment Service Practices, May 18th, 3-3:44pm ET, part of the 44 Webinar series. Presenters will share current research conducted with employment consultants who have been reporting their daily support activities, and how these data can impact the work employment consultants and others do to improve employment outcomes for people with intellectual and developmental disabilities. Registration is free and required. Previous 44 Webinars are archived on the project's website.

Webinar: Free Web Evaluation Tools - What They Can (and Can't) Do
The NIDILRR-funded Great Lakes ADA Regional Center (90DP0091) will host a webinar, Free Web Evaluation Tools: What They Can (and Can't) Do, May 18th, 2-3:30pm ET. This presentation will examine some common on-line tools that can be used to evaluate different aspects of web accessibility and why many web site features require human evaluation to truly determine if the site is accessible. The session will also discuss how different parts of the web team should be involved in evaluation and validation issues, including ongoing evaluation, and work together as a team to produce an accessible product. Registration is free and required.

Elsewhere in the Community: 

Depression, PTSD, and Other Mental Health Conditions in the Workplace
The US Equal Employment Opportunity Commission (EEOC) offers a question-and-answer factsheet, Depression, PTSD, and Other Mental Health Conditions in the Workplace: Your Legal Rights. The publication addresses frequently asked questions about job qualification, reasonable accommodations, workplace safety, disability-related questions employers may ask, and medical examinations they may require, as well as employers' duty to safeguard confidential medical information obtained.