News and Notes 227 August 17

Cool technology in NIDILRR-funded projects featured in NARIC blog post; Research in Focus highlights assistive glove that helps regaining hand function after stroke; MSKTC releases new hot topic module, Managing Bowel Function After Spinal Cord Injury (SCI); principal investigator of Access to Electronic and Personal Health Records interviewed in episode of Health Literacy Out Loud podcast; director of RTC: Rural to receive Distinguished Alumni Award from University of Montana; Great Lakes ADA Regional Center hosts webinar, Introduction to Policy-Driven Adoption for Accessibility: What It Is, and How It Can Benefit 508 Programs at the Federal Level; Social Security Administration hosts next National Ticket to Work Virtual Job Fair.

Date sent: 
2016-08-17
NARIC news: 

It may be hot here in DC, but we're thinking cool: Cool technology! We're fortunate to work with a community of researchers and developers who are building and integrating some really cool technology into rehabilitation. From robotic exoskeletons to body-powered prosthetics, web apps to telerehabilitation, these NIDILRR-funded projects are building the future of participation for people with disabilities. Meet some of these cool projects in our blog.

Research In Focus:
A New Assistive Glove Can Help People Regain Hand Function After a Stroke
This week's Research In Focus highlights new rehabilitation technology that shows promise for people recovering from stroke.

Resource Highlight: 

Managing Bowel Function After Spinal Cord Injury
The NIDILRR-funded Model Systems Knowledge Translation Center (MSKTC) (90DP0012) recently released a new hot topic module, Managing Bowel Function After Spinal Cord Injury (SCI). This suite of resources explains how a bowel program can help people with SCI control bowel movements and avoid surgery. The featured video and brief video clips introduce viewers to bowel management issues after injury via discussions with SCI participants and professionals at the NIDILRR-funded University of Michigan Spinal Cord Injury Model System Center (UM-SCIMS).

News items: 

Accessible Health Records in the Spotlight
Madeleine Rothberg, principal investigator for the recently-completed NIDILRR-funded project on Access to Electronic and Personal Health Records (90IF0010), was interviewed in Making Personal Health Records Accessible to All, an episode of the Health Literacy Out Loud podcast. Ms. Rothberg discussed how personal health records are being used to promote health with personalized health information and education, and presented a model for making this information accessible to people with sensory and physical disabilities.

RRTC PI to Receive UM Award
Tom Seekins, PhD, director of the NIDILRR-funded Rehabilitation Research and Training Center on Disability in Rural Communities (RTC: Rural) (90RT5025), will receive a Distinguished Alumni Award from the University of Montana (UM). Dr. Seekins will be recognized for his extensive work to improve the lives of people with disabilities and for bringing issues facing rural Americans with disabilities into the research arena. The award will be presented in September.

Grantee event: 

Introduction to Policy-Driven Adoption for Accessibility
The NIDILRR-funded Great Lakes ADA Regional Center (90DP0024) will host a webinar, Introduction to Policy-Driven Adoption for Accessibility: What It Is, and How It Can Benefit 508 Programs at the Federal Level, August 23rd, 1-2:30pm ET. Presenters will discuss a new approach some states have implemented to evaluate product accessibility when procuring information technology. Officials from three states who developed this policy approach will explain how it can be used to assess bids from vendors and be integrated into a state's procurement process. Registration is free and required by August 22nd.

Elsewhere in the Community: 

National Ticket to Work Virtual Job Fair
The Social Security Administration (SSA) will host its next National Ticket to Work Virtual Job Fair, August 24th, 11am-5pm ET. These job fairs give SSA Ticket to Work program participants an opportunity to “meet” employers, including federal contractors looking to hire people with disabilities, through online chat forums and one-on-one messages. In addition to visiting Employer Booths, job seekers can also take advantage of Resource Booths to get answers to questions and concerns about job accommodations, legal issues that present barriers to work, and Social Security work incentives. Registration is free and required.