News and Notes 198 January 27

Resources from NIDILRR community and elsewhere on preparedness during snow conditions, available from NARIC; NIDILRR presents webinar, Translating Evidence-Based Practices to Community Settings for People Aging with Disabilities and Their Caregivers; Healthy Aging RRTC publishes three plain-language summaries of recent research articles; Pathways RTC researcher featured in New York Times article on schizophrenic patients' role in their own care; MSKTC factsheet on spasticity and TBI is published in Archives of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation (APMR); RRTC on Advancing Employment for Individuals with Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities hosts webinar, Financial Well-Being: Reframing the Conversation; TU Collaborative seeks participants for Distance Supported Education: A Randomized, Controlled Trial; United Way Worldwide offers 2-1-1, a free, confidential information and referral helpline and website connecting people to health and human services in their community.

Date sent: 
2016-01-27
NARIC news: 

Here in Washington, we've spent the last five days digging out from under a year's-worth of snow. We were grateful to have lots of advance warning so we could prepare: charge up batteries for phones, computers, and assistive devices; stop at the store for essentials including medications and pet food; and make sure our homes and cars were ready for the cold and wind. Were you prepared? Take a look at these resources from the NIDILRR community and elsewhere on preparing for, digging out from, and playing in the snow!

Resource Highlight: 

Healthy Aging RRTC Plain Language Summaries
The NIDILRR-funded Rehabilitation Research and Training Center on Promoting Healthy Aging for Individuals with Long-Term Physical Disabilities (Healthy Aging RRTC) (90RT5023/H133B130018) has published three new plain language summaries of recent research articles. The summaries cover research on pain acceptance over time; the effects of chronic pain on depression and the potential mediational effects of anxiety, fatigue, and sleep; and sexual function, satisfaction, and use of sexual aids in adults living with physical disability.

NIDILRR News and Events: 

Webinar: Translating Evidence-Based Practices to Community Settings for People Aging with Disabilities and Their Caregivers - Gaps and Opportunities
NIDILRR staff and grantees will present at The Administration for Community Living's webinar, Translating Evidence-Based Practices to Community Settings for People Aging with Disabilities and their Caregivers: Gaps and Opportunities, February 4th, 1-2:30pm. Presenters from NIDILRR include Margaret Campbell and Ruth Brannon. Ivan Molton, PhD, from the NIDILRR-funded Rehabilitation Research and Training Center on Promoting Healthy Aging for Individuals with Long Term Physical Disabilities (90RT5023/H133B130018) and Laura Gitlin, PhD, from the Center for Innovative Care in Aging will also present. Presentations will be followed by comments and group discussion. Registration is free but required by February 1st. Email Lan.marshall@acl.hhs.gov to RSVP.

News items: 

Pathways RTC Researcher Featured in NY Times
Tamara Sale, principal investigator of the EASA Connections Project at the NIDILRR-funded Rehabilitation Research and Training Center on Pathways to Positive Futures (Pathways RTC), (90RT5030/H133B140039) was featured in Programs expand schizophrenic patients’ role in their own care, a recent New York Times article on person-centered care for people experiencing psychosis. Ms. Sale discussed the EASA program and young people working or staying in school while receiving care. This project is also supported by the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA).

Spasticity and TBI Factsheet in January APMR
Spasticity and Traumatic Brain Injury (abstract), a factsheet from the NIDILRR-funded Model Systems Knowledge Translation Center (MSKTC) (90DP0012/H133A110004), has been published as the education/information page in the January 2016 issue of the Archives of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation (APMR). The information page may be reproduced by APMR subscribers for patient/client education. The factsheet is also available from the MSKTC website.

Grantee event: 

Webinar: Financial Well-Being - Reframing the Conversation TOMORROW
The NIDILRR-funded Rehabilitation Research and Training Center on Advancing Employment for Individuals with Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities (90RT5028/H133B140026) will host a webinar, Financial Well-Being: Reframing the Conversation, TOMORROW, 3-3:44pm ET. Presenters will discuss how to frame conversations about employment toward achieving financial goals rather than concerns about losing benefits. Registration is free but required.

Participate: 

Distance Supported Education Study
The NIDILRR-funded Rehabilitation Research and Training Center on Community Living and Participation of Individuals with Psychiatric Disabilities (TU Collaborative) (90RT5021/H133B130014) seeks participants for a study, Distance Supported Education: A Randomized, Controlled Trial (PDF). The goal of the study is to learn how to support the success of students with mental health issues in higher education. Eligibility requirements include adults between ages 18 and 50 with a diagnosis of schizophrenia spectrum disorder, bipolar disorder, or depression, and enrollment in a 2- or 4-year college, university, or tech/vocational school. Participants will be compensated for each completed survey. For more information, contact research staff at 215/204-3457 or kpizz@temple.edu, or register online.

Elsewhere in the Community: 

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2-1-1, a service of United Way Worldwide, is a free, confidential information and referral helpline and website available across North America to connect people to health and human services in their community. Multi-lingual information and referral specialists connect callers to local agencies and organizations offering a range of services and supports. These services can include emergency shelter and housing, food assistance, employment and education, veterans services, health care and vaccinations, substance abuse and addiction support, mental health services, domestic violence prevention, senior services, and much more. In most communities, callers can simply dial 2-1-1 to reach the nearest call center; other centers offer toll-free numbers.