News and Notes 183 September 23

NARIC's Spanish-language information and referral services highlighted in observation of Hispanic Heritage Month; Northwest Regional Spinal Cord Injury System Center posts video: Spasticity and SCI: The Good, the Bad, and the Not-So-Ugly; principal investigator of Evaluation of Project TEAM: Effectiveness, Social Validity, and Feasibility presents as part of Health Matters: A Virtual Conference on All Things Health at Boston University; Lime Lighter technology is highlighted in Lime Lighter: Connecting the musician with low vision to the music and to the music-makers in Choir 21; TU Collaborative and RRTC on Psychiatric Disability and Co-Occurring Medical Conditions host webinar: Making Self-Directed Care a Reality; KTDRR hosts online conference: KT Solutions for Overcoming Barriers to Research Use; Centers for Disease Control and Prevention release new Spanish language video on early hearing screening and seeking out follow-up services for babies who do not pass the screening.

Date sent: 
2015-09-23
NARIC news: 

It's Hispanic Heritage Month! Did you know NARIC offers information and referral services in Spanish? We also blog, tweet, and post to Facebook and Pinterest in Spanish. We're not the only bilingual members of the NIDILRR community: Explore Spanish-language resources from the NIDILRR community and elsewhere.

Resource Highlight: 

Spasticity and SCI: The Good, the Bad, and the Not-So-Ugly
The NIDILRR-funded Northwest Regional Spinal Cord Injury System Center (NWRSCIS) (H133N110009) has posted a video, Spasticity and Spinal Cord Injury: The Good, the Bad, and the Not-So-Ugly, the latest in the SCI Forum series. The forum and accompanying report present the positive, negative, and neutral effects of spasticity, and explore a variety of conventional and nonconventional treatment options.

News items: 

Project TEAM Highlighted at Health Matters
Jessica Kramer, PhD, principal investigator for the NIDILRR-funded Evaluation of Project TEAM (Teens making Environment and Activity Modifications): Effectiveness, Social Validity, and Feasibility (H133G120091), presented as part of Health Matters: A Virtual Conference on All Things Health at Boston University on September 17th. Dr. Kramer discussed the current project and the value and importance of including young adults with disabilities in the research process. The full conference is available to view online.

Lime Lighter Brings Music into Focus for Violin Student
Lime Lighter, technology developed by Dancing Dots, Inc., under several NIDILRR-funded Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) grants (H133S070089, H133S060015), is highlighted in Lime Lighter: Connecting the musician with low vision to the music and to the music-makers (second item) in Choir 21. The article describes how Lime Lighter made a positive difference for one violin student with low vision, enabling her to practice and perform alongside her peers.

Grantee event: 

Webinar: Making Self-Directed Care a Reality
The NIDILRR-funded Rehabilitation Research and Training Center (RRTC) on Community Living and Participation of Individuals with Psychiatric Disabilities (TU Collaborative) (H133B130014) and the RRTC on Psychiatric Disability and Co-Occurring Medical Conditions (H133B100028) will host a webinar, Making Self-Directed Care a Reality, October 1st, 2:30pm ET. Presenters will introduce two new manuals on implementing mental health self-directed care, and will discuss the need for self-directed care initiatives, sharing examples and encouraging research results from two programs. Registration is free but required.

Online Conference: KT Solutions for Overcoming Barriers to Research Use
The NIDILRR-funded Center on Knowledge Translation for Disability and Rehabilitation Research (KTDRR) (H133A120012) will host KT Solutions for Overcoming Barriers to Research Use: An Online Conference, October 26th-28th. Presentations and interactive discussions will help researchers in the disability, independent living, and rehabilitation fields to identify barriers to the use of their research, as well as effective KT strategies to overcome these barriers. Registration is free but required for single days or the full conference.

Elsewhere in the Community: 

Spanish Language Video on Early Hearing Screening
The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention have released a new Spanish language video, ¿Qué tan bien oye su hijo? Lo que los padres deben saber (How well can your child hear? What parents need to know). The video features Spanish-speaking families describing their experiences when they received "did not pass" or "refer" results for their babies' hearing screening. Their stories provide facts and encouragement to help other parents seek out the follow-up services their baby needs.