News and Notes 178 August 19

Research and resources on fall prevention from NIDILRR community and beyond; Mid-Atlantic ADA Center releases Guide to Accessible Meetings, Events, and Conferences; pressure ulcer research by Rehabilitation Engineering Research Center on Spinal Cord Injury highlighted in MD Magazine; researchers from TBI model system centers receive awards from the Brain Injury Association of America; researcher at the Moss Traumatic Brain Injury Model System Center discusses TBI research on radio show Recovery Now; Southeast ADA Center hosts webcast, ADA Live! Episode 24: The School Year Has Started -- And It's Not Going Well; ProCEDD project recruiting participants for study on competitive employment for people with co-occurring opiate addiction and mental illness; US Department of Health and Human Services and Department of Justice issue Rights of Parents and Prospective Parents with Disabilities.

Date sent: 
2015-08-19
NARIC news: 

Did you know one in three older adults experiences a fall each year? According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), falls are the leading cause of non-fatal injuries for people over 65. One NIDILRR-funded survey found that people with long-term physical disabilities like multiple sclerosis and post-polio syndrome report falling all too often. We took a look at research and resources on falls and fall prevention from the NIDILRR community and other sources. Are you concerned about falling at home? Contact your local aging resource center to ask about an in-home safety screening.

Resource Highlight: 

Guide to Accessible Meetings, Events, and Conferences
The NIDILRR-funded Mid-Atlantic ADA Center (H133A110017) has released the Guide to Accessible Meetings, Events, and Conferences. The extensive guide covers site selection, pre-event activities, physical and audio-visual considerations, food service, personal assistants and service animals, tips for presenters and attendees, and emerging promising practices. The guide also includes a discussion of the market case for making an event accessible to all attendees.

News items: 

Pressure Ulcer Research Highlighted in MD Magazine
A computational model of pressure ulcers developed by the recently-completed NIDILRR-funded Rehabilitation Engineering Research Center on Spinal Cord Injury (SCI) (H133E070024) was highlighted in Computation model can help treat ulcers in patients with spinal cord injury in MD Magazine. Researchers developed the computational model based on photos of ulcers in actual patients and ran virtual trials of two potential therapies. Findings were published in A computational, tissue-realistic model of pressure ulcer formation in individuals with spinal cord injury (full text) in PLOS Computational Biology.

TBI Model Systems Researchers Receive BIAA Awards
Two researchers from NIDILRR-funded traumatic brain injury (TBI) model system centers received awards from the Brain Injury Association of America (BIAA). Mark Sherer, PhD, principal investigator for the Texas TBI Model System Center at TIRR (H133A120020) received the William Fields Caveness Award, recognizing outstanding research contributions that improve the lives of people with TBI. Dr. Sherer is also the director of research for the NIDILRR-funded Rehabilitation Research and Training Center on Developing Strategies to Foster Community Integration and Participation for Persons with TBI (H133B090023). Kieth Cicerone, PhD, principal investigator of the recently-completed JFK-Johnson Rehabilitation Institute TBI Model System Center (2007-2012) (H133A070030) received the Sheldon Berrol, MD, Clinical Service Award, honoring his long career and outstanding contributions to improving the quality of care, professional training, and education in the field of brain injury.

NIDILRR Researcher Discusses TBI Research on Recovery Now
John Whyte, MD, PhD, co-director of the NIDILRR-funded Moss Traumatic Brain Injury (TBI) Model System Center (H133A120037) will be a guest speaker on Recovery Now, a weekly radio show on the Brain Injury Radio Network. Dr. Whyte will discuss TBI research and issues of rehabilitation and recovery for brain injury survivors. The show will air August 26th at 10pm ET. September 9th at 10pm ET.

Grantee event: 

ADA Live! The School Year Is Not Going Well
The NIDILRR-funded Southeast ADA Center (H133A110021) will host a webcast, ADA Live! Episode 24: The School Year Has Started -- And It's Not Going Well. What Can I Do? September 2nd, 1-1:30pm ET. Georgia Fruechtenicht from Parent to Parent of Georgia (P2PGA) will discuss options parents have when their child's school year is not going well and effective communication techniques parents can use to address their concerns, strengthen partnerships with teachers, and get their children the support they need to succeed at school. Participants can submit their questions in advance and connect to archived shows at www.adalive.org.

Participate: 

Community-Based Employment for Dually Diagnosed Study in DC
The NIDILRR-funded project on An Integrated Program to Improve Competitive Employment in Dually Diagnosed Clients (ProCEDD) (H133G140261) is recruiting participants for a study on finding and retaining competitive employment for people with co-occurring opiate addiction and serious mental illness. Participants must be residents of the District of Columbia 18 or older with health insurance. Qualifying participants will be asked to take Suboxone to control opiate cravings and to participate in weekly group treatment sessions. Each participant will work with an employment specialist to receive job placement assistance. Over the period of the study, participants will also complete surveys, for which they will be compensated with gift cards. Interested parties may contact Imani Brown at 202/865-0097 or Imani.brown1@howard.edu.

Elsewhere in the Community: 

Protecting the Rights of Parents and Prospective Parents with Disabilities The US Department of Health and Human Services and the Department of Justice have issued Rights of Parents and Prospective Parents with Disabilities. This technical assistance brief assists state and local child welfare agencies and courts in protecting the civil rights of parents and prospective parents with disabilities while also protecting the welfare of children and families.